Takeaways From The 2013 Midwest Sports Performance Conference

May 15th, 2013

Category: Coaching

Takeaways From The 2013 Midwest Sports Performance Conference

Loren Landow
• “My job is teaching athletes how to leverage the levers about the center of mass.”
• The bottom line for every movement on the court/field is how do I get back to acceleration.
• Eccentric control is extremely important.
• The goal for athletes is to do all the right things from the wrong positions. Things to look for on agility assessments: weight distribution, how do they use the edges of their feet, spacing of the feet relative to hips, loaded position of hips, primary action of re-acceleration post deceleration.

• “How do we make people tolerant to snake bite? We give them doses of venom. If I want to create tendon strength and integrity of the ankle, knee, and hip complex along with awareness I’ve got to give you doses of venom. Not mega doses, I don’t want to kill you, I want to give you doses of venom so that you tolerate the stress and you adapt to the stress.”

• We need to do some type of agility while fatigued. Most injuries happen post fatigue, so the athlete should learn how to control their movements in a fatigued state.

• In the 5-10-5 drill you are driving off the inside foot. Use your edges!
• The quicker the foot can get back to the ground the faster you will be. Don’t waist valuable time by doing long foot cycles.

Andrea Hudy
• Use force plates as assessment. Develop program based off results.
• KU uses non-linear periodization to tailor program to the players fatigue level and schedule.
• As the season progresses mobility becomes more important.
• You can use a different foot stance to focus more anterior or posterior chain.
• Ask which bar position is comfortable.. perform the opposite.
• Using Elite Form System helps track workouts, provides instant video feedback, tracks bar speed and power output. This takes the guesswork out of oly lifts!
• Use a ramp (raise heels) to gain ROM in the overhead squat.
• A box with adjustable height is a great tool for the RFESS.
• Loading the RFESS in the front squat position is a good variation.
• Jumps to a pull up bar and rotational jumps to pull-ups is a good basketball specific exercise.
• Big guys CAN squat.
• Upper body plyo’s are valuable.. clapping pushups are a good way to develop upper body “pushing power”.
• KU’s staff works in synergy w/ no ego’s.
• Every member of the staff was approachable and down to earth.
• Interns had the capability of coaching, but also didn’t mind racking weights.. No ego’s.
• The “culture” that Coach Hudy and her staff provides is second to none.

Dr. William Kraemer
• Don’t be afraid to do 1 RM. Research has shown a higher injury rate for 10rm than 1rm.
• Corporate fitness isn’t new. In fact, it dates back to the 1800’s.
• Resistance training can improve flexibility.
• Taking every set to failure is detrimental.
• Hypertrophy/Strength/Power will all be negatively influenced by endurance work.
• Power output tells you everything you need to know.
• Connective tissues can be broken down by free radicals because of catabolic stressors.

Bill Self
• “I like having Hudy so that I don’t have to be the bad guy all the time”.
• Their players use a ratio of about 1:3 or 1:4 (time spend in weight room to time spent on court). Off season could be as high as 1:2.
• KU has had very few injuries in recent years thanks to the Strength program.
• “I did nutrisystem with Sherron Collin to get him to lose weight.. It sucked!”
• Coach Self gives 100% of physical development responsibilities to the Strength staff. NO interference!

Dr. Phil Wagner
• Force plates tell you A LOT about an athlete. They are the best assessments.
• The best force producers are the best athletes.
• Force plates can predict bilateral deficiencies.
• From force plate they are mostly concerned with
1. Load
2. Explode
3. Drive
• From these categories they can plan training accordingly and focus on anterior chain, core, or posterior chain.
• The taller you are the more bracing becomes important.
• Vertical force development is very important for all athletic movements.
• They have seen ethnicity differences in force outputs.
• For diet give a positive message. Don’t tell them what they cannot do, tell them what they can do. If they get 1 g protein/lb of body weight and 8 servings of vegges, eating bad foods becomes less desirable.
• Too much info to recite here! See more at http://spartascience.com/

Scott Moody
• “The ready, fire, aim approach will never work in long term athletic development. Success requires a system.”
• Women are 2-8 x more likely than males to tear ACL.
• Hamstring strength may be critical in ACL injury prevention.
• After age 12 ligament injuries start occurring more frequently.
• “Before you teach, show you care.”
• Engage young athletes in the “journey” not the “destination”.
• “Art requires the artist to care, and to care enough to do something they know might not work”-Seth Godin
• Hard skills= power cleans, squats, positioning drills, standardized tests (5-10-5, 40 yrd dash), sports skills such as tennis serve and route running. Hard skills are developed by coach watching closely, correcting, refining. ABC’s (always be consistent).
• Soft skills= reactive 1v1 skills, creative play (knowing when and how fast), timing, etc. Developed by free play setting, NO coaching, trial and error. 3 R’s (Read, Recognize, and React).
• Hard skills set the framework, Soft skills make it beautiful.
• Begin with hard skills to set foundation.. then turn them loose in specific appropriate games.
• Don’t just use constant agility test.. make them get their head up and make decisions. Tests MUST reflect the demands of their sport.

Glenn Cain
• The Elite Form system is bad ass.
• Each rep on the platforms is recorded in 3d and can be viewed by the athlete immediately.
• Measures power output in watts for each rep.
• Measures bar speed.
• Great for fatigue management.
• “Athletes somehow find a way to lose workout cards.” Elite form tracks every workout and eliminates workout cards + holds athletes accountable on each and ever rep!
• Can look at time to peak power on each rep.
• According to their data the highest power outputs were
1. High pull
2. Hang power clean
3. Hang power snatch
4. Clean Front Squat

Boyd Epley
• Safety, safety, safety.
• Since 2000 college football has had 21 indirect sudden deaths w/ 55% occurring on the first or second day of practice. Introduce training stimulus slowly!
• Do not use exercise and conditioning as punishment.
• Football coaches should NOT be doing aerobic work.
• Develop emergency action plans. Stuff happens!

Meg Stone
• “Those enamored of practice without science, are like a pilot who goes into a ship without a rudder or compass and never has any certainty of where he is going.”- Leonardo De Vinci
• The majority of differences in the cardiovascular system are related to size.
• No difference between genders for muscle fiber type.
• Females are 40-60% weaker in the upper body.
• Females are 25% weaker in lower body.
• When strength is expressed relative to lean body mass in some cases there are no gender differences.
• Reducing Strength and Conditioning program results in higher risk of injury.
• Women’s strength gains may plateau after 3-5 months of heavy training.
• Men at rest have 5-10 times the resting androgen concentrations of Women.
• Michelle Davis ran the 1984 marathon- 6 months pregnant.
• The primary difference between men and women appear to be size based, therefore, program differences should be minimal. Females may need more upper body emphasis than males. Menstrual cycle must be taken into consideration.

Ross Schwisow
• Emphasis health in a HS Strength program.
• Few of your high school athletes will play in college. Set them up for life.
• Coach Schwisow uses levels that athletes progress through. You could have a senior in a freshman group if they are at the same physical level.
• Create adversity for students to handle. Life is hard.
• Use chunks to teach kids their routine.
• Take time to celebrate accomplishments.
• Show that you’re a teacher first.
• Coach Schwisow has a great program going at his high school and has a huge buy in to the program from his students.

Aaron Carbuhn
• Nutrient recommendations won’t be the same every day. Your training will dictate your diet for the day.
• Offer athletes realistic food choices.
• Give options for improved on-campus lunches.
• Use performance plates. Higher carb/ higher healthy fat plate for harder training days.
• Using supplements to try to fix a broken diet is like mowing the lawn while your house is burning down.
• 4 essential supplements—Multi vitamin, Fish oil, Vitamin D, and UCAN.
• When nutrition comes together the skies the limit.

Dr. Fry
• Free or inexpensive software programs and apps.
1. Kinovea (computer based)
2. Kinesiocapture
3. Ubersense
4. CoachMyVideo
5. Video Physics From Vernier
6. Coaches Eye
7. NSCA Exercise App
• Unlimited options for use
1. Track bar
2. Track time to get off floor
3. Compare joint angles
4. Assess movement
• Make videos and send to athletes and coaches

Daniel Schaefer
• Become proficient w/ excel.. It can save you time for programming.
• Create excel buttons.
• Use excel tricks for sports YouTube channel as a guide
• Spend time coaching not programming

Paul Luebbers
• Occlusion training is restriction of arterial blood flow to the muscles.
• Blood flow restriction has been shown to attenuate atrophy and induce hypertrophy.
• Positive muscle adaptations have been observed w/ out training.
• Powerlifting wraps have been used.
• Research backs occlusion training but the mechanisms are not understood.

Scott Holsopple
• Intensity is a one set mindset
• Being a life coach is more important than being a strength coach
• Manual resistance can be performed for just about every muscle group
• Manual resistance is great for team building
• KU football uses no aerobic work over 1 minute unless the goal is weight loss for a certain player.

Joe Staub
• Track and Field may have anywhere from 20-60 athletes in the weight room at a given time.
• Track coaches usually have 40-80% of the strength program. The head track and field coach will be more involved in the strength program than any other sport.
• If an athlete just isn’t getting the Olympic lifts, don’t force it. You can always use another form of powerful triple extension (couldn’t agree more).
• Coach Staub uses a “Flexible Linear Progressive Block Periodization”.

Loren Landow
• “My job is teaching athletes how to leverage the levers about the center of mass.”
• The bottom line for every movement on the court/field is how do I get back to acceleration.
• Eccentric control is extremely important.
• The goal for athletes is to do all the right things from the wrong positions.
• Things to look for on agility assessments: weight distribution, how do they use the edges of their feet, spacing of the feet relative to hips, loaded position of hips, primary action of re-acceleration post deceleration.
• “How do we make people tolerant to snake bite? We give them doses of venom. If I want to create tendon strength and integrity of the ankle, knee, and hip complex along with awareness I’ve got to give you doses of venom. Not mega doses, I don’t want to kill you, I want to give you doses of venom so that you tolerate the stress and you adapt to the stress.”
• We need to do some type of agility while fatigued. Most injuries happen post fatigue, so the athlete should learn how to control their movements in a fatigued state.
• In the 5-10-5 drill you are driving off the inside foot. Use your edges!
• The quicker the foot can get back to the ground the faster you will be. Don’t waist valuable time by doing long foot cycles.

Scott Caulfield
• D-A=0… Decision-Action= Nothing
• “I am very discouraged what should I do? Encourage others.”
• Trust is a brick wall, it needs to be earned and tested.
• Core values+purpose= Core ideology
• The art of coaching= science+emotion.. too much of either science or emotion is not a good thing. You need a good balance of both to be successful-Martin Rooney
• Most people have a vision problem and not a discipline problem. Know what your athletes/staffs dreams are.

DISCUSSION 3 Comments

  1. Michael Zweifel May 30, 2013 at 10:23 AM

    Like the new site!

    Sounds like a great mixture of speakers, thanks for the great review.

    Quick question of clarification – on Loren Landow’s section, you said
    “In the 5-10-5 drill you are driving off the inside foot. Use your edges!”

    Is he saying to use the medial part of your foot or should you be using more of the lateral aspect?

    Thanks Paul. Also nice article in Stack!

    • PJF Performance June 1, 2013 at 7:44 PM

      Thanks Michael! Yeah the conference was loaded with great speakers.

      Landow was talking about using edges in the 5-10-5, meaning you should be on the lateral aspect of the inside foot (drive foot) and the medial part of the outside foot. So if you were touching the line to the right.. you would be using the lateral aspect of your left foot, and medial aspect of right foot. Ive been playing around with it a bit and i think it makes a lot of sense as it help you get from deceleration to acceleration quicker.

      You would have loved Dr. Phil Wagners presentation on the sparta system. Definitely gave me a lot of new idea for VJ. Also made me obsessed with force plates haha

      • Michael Zweifel June 2, 2013 at 1:23 AM

        Ok now I ge the edges part. Gonna have to try that out.

        I’ve read and watched a lot of Dr. Wagners stuff, and yes it in incredibly interesting. It would be so cool to have a force plate, and the way he implements it is very interesting. I guess the only negative I have from him is he seems to use his own terms and definitions for things. But once you grasp it everything does make a lot of sense.

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